The Joint WMO-IOC Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology

wmo stationery logo small


  MPERSS

   Marine Pollution Emergency Response Support System for the high seas

 

 

 

Marine Pollution Incident (MPI) AREA X

The South Indian and Southern Oceans east of 80°E and south of 30°S to 95°E, to 12°S, to 127°E; thence the Timor Sea, South Pacific and Southern Oceans south of 10°S to 141°E to the equator, to 170°E, to 29°S, thence SW_wards to 45°S in 160°E, then the 160°E meridian.

AMOC : Australia

Contact point
Mr Neal Moodie, Bureau of Meteorology, PO Box 1289K, Melbourne Victoria, Australia 3001
Tel: +61 3 9669 4768
Fax: +61 3 9669 4695
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: www.bom.gov.au
Operational contact point (24 h)
Shift Supervisor, National Meteorological and Oceanographic Centre, Bureau of Meteorology, PO Box 1289K, Melbourne Victoria, Australia 3001
Tel: +61 3 9662 2182
Fax: +61 3 9662 1222
Fax: +61 3 9662 1223
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Supporting Services

 

Relevant contact points

New Zealand
Duty Manager, Meteorological Service of New Zealand, P.O. Box 722, Wellington, New Zealand.
Tel: +64 4 470 0775
Fax: +64 4 471 2078
Fiji
Duty Manager, Fiji Meteorological Service, Ministry of communications and Civil Aviation, Private Mail Bag NAP 0351, Nadi Airport, Fiji.
Tel: +679 72 4888
Fax: +679 72 0430
Papua New Guinea
Duty Manager, National Weather Service, P.O. Box 1240, BOROKO, Papua New Guinea.
Tel: +675 325 2788
Fax: +675 325 2740
Vanuatu
Duty Manager, Vanuatu Meteorological Service, Private Mail Bag 54, Port Vila, Vanuatu.
Tel: +678 822 932
New Caledonia
Duty Manager, Meteo France - New Caledonia, Noumea, New Caledonia
Tel: +687 27 9300
Fax: +687 27 4295

Marine Pollution Emergency Response Authority

Australian Maritime Safety Authority
Mr Paul Irving, Australian Maritime Safety Authority
Emergency Response
GPO Box 2181, Canberra ACT, Australia 2601
Tel: +61 2 6279 5680
Fax: +61 2 6279 5076
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
24h/Day
Duty Officer, AMSA Rescue Coordination Centre
GPO Box 2181, Canberra ACT, Australia 2601
Tel: +61 2 6230 6811
Fax: +61 2 6230 6868
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Marine pollution transport model available under MPERSS

Type of pollution model Oil and Chemical
Name of model OSTM (Combination of HYDROMAP & OILMAP)
HYDROMAP (Hydrodynamic- continental shelf)
OILMAP (Spill trajectory and weathering model) and ALOHA (Chemical gaseous plume model)
References AMSA OSTM http://www.apasa.com.au/amsa_ostm.html
Details OSTM: Top 30 questions http://www.amsa.gov.au/Marine_Environment_Protection/National_Plan/General_Information/Oil_Spill_Trajectory_Model/OSTM30.asp
HYDROMAP: http://www.appsci.com/hydromap/index.htm
OILMAP: http://www.appsci.com/oilmap/index.htm
ALOHA: http://archive.orr.noaa.gov/cameo/aloha.html
Free No
Input (pollutant data) Type, grade, quantity of oil, geographic location, spill rate, start time and other critical time data.
Input (Environmental data) Wind speed and direction at start and key times or way points. Provided by NWP model output from the Bureau of Meteorology.
Continental shelf current (speed, direction) provided by HYDROMAP
Offshore current (speed, direction) values provided through CSIRO surface current model.
Sea surface temperature (SST) data
Trajectory algorithm: Wind Provided by NWP model output from the Bureau of Meteorology
Supported with real time coastal wind monitoring station data provide on-line web by BoMet.
Trajectory algorithm: Current Output from a hydrodynamic model (HYDROMAP) but also utilises CSIRO geostrophic currents derived from satellite altimeter and sea surface temperature imagery.
Trajectory algorithm: Waves (generation method, effect on advection) Provided by the numerical wave prediction model (WAM) operated by the Bureau of Meteorology.
Fate algorithm: evaporation, emulsification... Yes
Model Validation Use as evidence in prosecutions of ships polluting Australian waters
Ground truth exercise carried out by AMSA
http://www.amsa.gov.au/Marine_Environment_Protection/National_Plan/General_Information/Oil_Spill_Trajectory_Model/OSTM30.asp#questiontwentyseven SAR events are also used to evaluate the spill tracking system.
Application area Metarea 10
Real-time response capacity The system is fully operable in real time.

During recent years the following improvements to OSTM were made:
    • high definition coastline vector datasets were added for mainland Australia and offshore territories;
    • the interface of OSTM with Australian Hydrographic Office (AHO) raster based nautical charts (GeoTiff format) was enabled;
    • S57 ENC chart data from AHO for Queensland was incorporated;
    • digital bathymetry data has been increased significantly in coverage and resolution with that previously available (250m gridded Australia wide);
    • evaluation and upgrade of the hydrodynamic model to HYDROMAP was undertaken;
    • upgrades of the OILMAP software were made to provide additional data manipulation, data visualisation and model output features;
    • interface of the spill model output of OSTM with the Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA) GIS system was enabled leading to improved delivery of information to National Plan stakeholders;
    • casual staff were employed to digitise and update underlying operational datasets (bathymetry and detailed coastlines);
    • efficiency testing of the model was undertaken using a ground truth exercise in Moreton Bay, Queensland;
    • the ability to include large-scale currents measured by satellites supplied by CSIRO was implemented;
    • use of detailed spatial wind data provided by BoMet for entire region (3 day forecast data) was enabled;
    • tools were developed to integrate NetCDF wind and current data directly from the data providers web site via FTP;
    • the ability to view and animate spatial wind files was implemented; and
    • an additional tool was developed to allow a number of individual current and wind files to be added to generate predictions over longer time periods.

MPERSS trials

Date(s) and period(s) of trials Brief summary of results
Ongoing opportunistic in conjunction with SAR events. The system has demonstrated its effectiveness during its operational phase over recent years.
A number of datasets are under constant improvement.
Regular updates are made to the following fundamental datasets of OSTM:
    • high resolution bathymetric data sets;
    • tidal amplitudes and phase constants;
    • altimeter data from the Topex-Poseidon satellite (TPOX6.1);
    • high resolution coastline datasets, and
    • nautical charts and satellite imagery as underlays for display of model outputs.
Examples of one ground truth of the model is provide at:
http://www.amsa.gov.au/Marine_Environment_Protection/National_Plan/General_Information/Oil_Spill_Trajectory_Model/OSTM30.asp#questiontwentyseven

Actual marine pollution emergencies

Date(s) and duration(s) of incidents Brief summary of results
Numerous, see www.amsa.gov.au under "National Plan Incidents" In addition to playing a key role during an oil spill response, modelling is becoming an integral part of evidence in court cases concerning oil spills and used as evidence in a number of prosecutions.

A new hydrodynamic model, HYDROMAP, was implemented recently and expands the modelling capability and supports the incorporation of live metocean data, including satellite observations of large-scale currents from CSIRO, and detailed wind data from the Bureau of Meteorology. A new version of the oil spill mapping component of the model, OILMAP, was also recently installed. OILMAP is used by governments, research institutes and oil companies in at least 40 countries. AMSA will continue to monitor international developments in modelling systems for marine incident response.

Further details of the system and its use can be found at:
http://www.amsa.gov.au/Marine_Environment_Protection/National_Plan/General_Information/Oil_Spill_Trajectory_Model/OSTM_FAQ.asp

 

(Last Updated: 04-06-2013)

Hosted by
UNESCO/IOC Project Office for IODE Oostende, Belgium